You know what’s ‘fetch’? Jonathan Bennett’s engagement

The actor widely known for his role as Aaron Samuels in the chick flick “Mean Girls” is now engaged to boyfriend Jaymes Vaughan

You know what’s ‘fetch’? Jonathan Bennett’s engagement

Guess we know that “Mean Girls” actor Jonathan Bennett ain’t gonna ask anyone else for a date since he’s too busy “ugly” crying after boyfriend Jaymes Vaughan proposed to him yesterday. According to Bennett’s Instagram post, Vaughan made the moment extra special—from having custom made rings, to the song he wrote for Bennett. 

In an interview with People, Bennett said, “What we have is really special. It’s the thing people make movies about or, I guess in this case, write songs about. I think we’ve both known since the day we met on set at Jaymes’s show that we were going to be each other’s person. It feels like family being with him. I feel like there’s nothing in the world we can’t accomplish when we are together.”

The couple also gave the publication a rundown of what happened during the actual proposal, which had special participation from Bennett’s sister and friends. Apparently, the song Vaughan wrote was conceived while Bennett was in Canada filming his upcoming movie, “The Christmas House.” 

“It’s amazing what magic can happen with a friend and a guitar when you’re trying to create something to tell someone you want to spend forever with them. Thank God he was filming in Canada for six weeks, otherwise I don’t know how I would have pulled this off,” said Vaughan.

In case you’re wondering, the couple started dating in 2017 and have been “Instagram official” on Halloween that same year. And while Bennett did admit he wanted a proposal full of drag queens and a flash mob, I’m pretty sure he has forgiven Vaughan since he was extremely touched by the TV host’s efforts. Are y’all ready to cry when the couple releases their proposal video? I’m not.


Photo courtesy of Jonathan Bennett’s Instagram account

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